Psychology, Culture & Religion Group
American Academy of Religion
Annual Meeting Atlanta,
November 20-24, 2015

PRESENTERS: Take a look at the PCR Guidelines for Presenters
for helpful hints on how PCR sessions differ from the usual AAR practice
.

Click on the paper titles to see drafts where available.

PRE-SESSIONS:

MAIN SESSIONS:

Friday, November 20, 2014

1:30‐2:45 PM
Psychological and Religious Perspectives on Moral Injury

3:00 - 4:00 PM
Asian/Asian American Issues and Perspectives in Pastoral Theology: The Intersections of Culture and Care

4:15-6:30 PM
Documentary: Serving Life 

7:00 - 9:30 PM
PCR Dinner

Saturday, November 21, 2014

9:00 - 10:00 AM
New Studies in Religion and Psychology

10:00-11:30 AM
Works in Progress and Business Meeting

Saturday, November 21, 2014

4:00 - 6:30 PM
Cross-Cultural and Cognitive Approaches to Changes in Sense of Self

Sunday, November 22, 2014

9:00 - 11:00 AM
Help, Harm, or Resistance? Psychological and Religious Practices of Caregiving in a Neo-Liberal Society

1:00 - 2:30 PM
Healing Between Religion and the Secular in North America

5:00 - 6:30 PM
Society Without God? "Existential Health" and Alternative Frameworks for Meaning-Making


 

Pre-Sessions

P20-222
Fri., Nov. 20
1:30 - 2:45 PM

Hilton-213
(Level 2)


Theme: Psychological and Religious Perspectives on Moral Injury

Storm Swain, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, Presiding 

Carrie Doehring, Iliff School of Theology
Zachary Moon, Iliff School of Theology 
Spiritual integration of moral injury for future military chaplains: Using spiritual practices and theological reflexivity within a seminary context

Lisa Cataldo, Fordham University 
Fragmentation and Reparation: A Psychoanalytic Contribution to the Understanding of Moral Injury and Healing

Daniel Moceri, Graduate Theological Union 
We Overcome the Wound Together: A Trans-Disciplinary Systemic Approach to Healing Moral Injury

Fri., Nov. 20
2:45- 3:00 PM

BREAK

P20-223
Fri., Nov. 20
3:00 - 4:00 PM
Hilton-213
(Level 2)

Theme: Asian/Asian American Issues and Perspectives in Pastoral Theology: The Intersections of Culture and Care

In this roundtable discussion, Asian and Asian North American scholars will identify and discuss issues of pastoral theology, intercultural care, counseling, and intersectionality, pointing to current and future research trajectories.

Round Table Panelists: 

  • Insook Lee, New York Theological Seminary
  • Kirsten S. Oh, Azusa Pacific University
  • Chizuko Saito, Doshisha Women's College of Liberal Arts, Japan
  • Siroj Sorajjakool, Loma Linda University
Fri., Nov. 20
4:00 - 4:15 PM
BREAK

P20-318
Fri., Nov. 20
4:15 - 6:30 PM
Hilton-213
(Level 2)

Documentary: Serving Life 

The 2011 documentary "Serving Life" explores the emotional and relational impact of hospice care in Angola, a maximum security prison in Louisiana. Prisoners volunteer to care for fellow prisoners who are dying while serving life sentences. Narrated by Forest Whitaker. Moderated discussion will follow a screening of the 86-minute documentary. 

Presider: Lisa Cataldo, Fordham University

Discussion Moderator: Eileen Campbell-Reed, Central Baptist Theological Seminary 

Special Guest: Nick Stuart, Executive Producer, "Serving Life," President and CEO, Odyssey Networks  

Fri., Nov. 20
7:00 PM


PCR Dinner: After the end of the Friday pre-session, everyone is welcome to join us at the Pacific Rim Bistro, with Asian seafood cuisine, just a short walk from the conference center.  We have reservations for 7 pm, with a semi-private space for our group to enjoy further conversation after the pre-session.  The menu offers a range of options at varying prices, which is more than can be said for most conference-area restaurants.  The PCR group traditionally pays half the check for graduate students who attend the dinner.  See you there!

www.pacificrimbistro.com/menu_dinner.htm

P21-115
Sat., Nov. 21
9:00 -10:00 AM
Hyatt-Techwood (Atlanta Conference Level)



Theme: New Studies in Religion and Psychology

The two papers in this session represent new work in areas of religion and psychology not covered by other PCR sessions. The first presentation takes a new historical look at two of the classic works in the early development of the psychology of religion, discussing how Starbuck and James influenced each other’s ideas about conversion, mysticism, and other aspects of religious experience. The second presentation explores the psychological and theological impact of community disasters (Hurricane Katrina is the main example here), using the work of sociologist Kai T. Erikson and others to illuminate the process of rebuilding a religious framework of meaning in the aftermath of collective trauma.

Kelly Bulkeley, Graduate Theological Union, Presiding

Benjamin Fong, The University of Chicago
Freak Stuff or Protestant Stock-in-Trade?: Edwin Diller Starbuck’s The Psychology of Religion in Light of its Influence on William James

Stephanie C. Edwards, Boston College
Resisting the “Victim Soul”: An Embodied Christian Response to Communal Trauma in the Wake of Natural Disasters

P21-116
Sat., Nov. 21
10:00 -11:30 AM
Hyatt-Techwood (Atlanta Conference Level)



Works in Progress and Business Meeting

This is an open-ended session in which anyone interested in psychology, culture, and religion is invited to share their current projects and receive feedback from PCR members. Newcomers are welcome! The end of the session will shift into the business meeting of the PCR Group. The primary task at this meeting is to suggest possible topics for the Call for Papers for the 2016 AAR annual meeting, along with ideas for next year’s Friday and Saturday Pre-Sessions.

10:00 to 11:00 am
Works in Progress

Kelly Bulkeley, Graduate Theological Union, Presiding

11:00 to 11:30am
PCR Business Meeting

Eileen Campbell-Reed, Central Baptist Theological Seminary, Presiding

 

Main Sessions

A21-313
Sat., Nov. 21
4:00 -6:30 PM
Hilton-Grand Ballroom C (Level 2)



Theme: Cross-Cultural and Cognitive Approaches to Changes in Sense of Self

Religion and the Social Sciences Section and Cognitive Science of Religion Group and Psychology, Culture, and Religion Group

Albert Silva, University of California, Santa Barbara, Presiding

Significant changes in sense of self are reported both within and beyond religious traditions, as such changes rely on natural mental systems and processes. They can be involuntary, impairing, and diagnosed as a mental disorder, or they can be deliberately sought, cultivated, and highly valued within a religious system. Comparisons across qualitative, textual, and psychological sources raise important questions about the phenomenology of religious experiences and the social, cultural and psychological factors that influence them. Buddhist practices and resultant experiences closely resemble what psychologists call depersonalization. A neurobiological model for meditation-induced depersonalization demonstrates the impact of both phenomena on neural networks associated with self-referential processing. Comparison of the revelatory experiences of Joseph Smith (The Book of Mormon) and Helen Schucman (A Course in Miracles) with highly hypnotizable subjects suggests a common ability to dissociate executive control and normal self-referential processing to allow another “self” to construct its own narrative.

Robert N. McCauley, Emory University
George Graham, Georgia State University
Religious Experience, Schizophrenia, and Disownership of Self

Jared Lindahl, Brown University
Meditation-Induced Changes in Sense of Self Reported by American Buddhists: History and Phenomenology

Willoughby Britton, Brown University
Meditation-Induced Changes in Sense of Self Reported by American Buddhists: Neurobiology and Cross-cultural Psychiatry

Ann Taves, University of California, Santa Barbara
Shifts in Sense of Self in the Production of the Book of Mormon and A Course in Miracles

A22-134
Sun., Nov 22
9:00 - 11:30 AM
Hilton-Grand Salon D (Level 2)



Theme: Help, Harm, or Resistance? Psychological and Religious Practices of Caregiving in a Neo-Liberal Society

Pamela Cooper-White, Union Theological Seminary, Presiding

Jessica Van Denend, Union Theological Seminary
Neoliberalism's Empathy and the Denial of Complicity and/or Commonality with the Suffering Other

Richard Coble, Vanderbilt University
Chaplain as Cyborg: Negotiating Care in a Neoliberal Age

Melinda McGarrah Sharp, Phillips Theological Seminary
Locked in Disbelief: Reading Michelle Alexander and Jessica Benjamin to Loosen Resistance in the Bonds of Love

Cedric Johnson, Wesley Theological Seminary
Fanon, Freud, and Foucault: Towards an Integrative Approach to Soul Care in the Neoliberal Age

Mary Clark Moschella, Yale University
Joyful, Spiritual Resistance: A Case Study


A22-207
Sun., Nov 22
1:00 -2:30 PM
Hilton-Grand Ballroom C (Level 2)



Theme: Healing Between Religion and the Secular in North America

North American Religions Section and Psychology, Culture, and Religion Group and Religions, Medicines, and Healing Group and Secularism and Secularity Group

Emily Wu, Dominican University of California, Presiding

Shenandoah Nieuwsma, University of North Carolina
Between “Religion” and “the Secular:” Negotiating Healthcare “Spirituality’s” Place in the Twenty-First Century

Ira Helderman, Vanderbilt University
“Religion” and “Secular” in U.S. Psychotherapists’ Interface with Buddhist Traditions

Justin Stein, University of Toronto
The Impact of Different Framings of Reiki’s "Spirituality" on Access to U.S. Healthcare Sites

Katie Givens Kime, Emory University
The Buffered Addict: Beneath the “Religious or Not?” of Twelve-Step Programs

Responding:
Albert Silva, University of California, Santa Barbara


A22-318
Sun., Nov 22
5:00 -6:30 PM
Marriott-A601 (Atrium Level)



Theme: Society Without God? "Existential Health" and Alternative Frameworks for Meaning-Making

Storm Swain, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, Presiding

Carrie Doehring, Iliff School of Theology
A Critical Phenomenological Pastoral Theological Method for Responding to Suffering in Ways That Respect Religious Differences

Jonathan Stotts, Vanderbilt University
Homo Religiosus, Homo Proiciendus: Meaning-Making as Projection or Sublimation?

Annhild Tofte Haga, University of Oslo
Dialogues and Conflicts between Images of Jesus and Experiences of Being Oneself in Life Story Narratives: An Example of Dialogical Self Theory as an Analytical Tool in Empirical Research on Images of God

Due to unavoidable circumstances Annhild Tofte Haga is unable to attend AAR as outlined.